Tag: Validation

Back to Basics 6 – Always Check your Parse

Back to Basics 6 – Always Check your Parse

Back to Basics 6 – Always Check your Parse

This is of course connected to the previous remarks about constructing phrases with booleans or non-booleans. But I would like to take a moment to go a little further and remind those of you starting out of the importance of the parsing process. In some ways, the old Version 10 user experience, where the parsing engine results were popped up in Word directly, when you validated / compiled your work, was easier to explain. It oriented users towards the idea of checking the parse straight away:

opa-10-select-parse

In the above example, everything is fine. But the process was useful when the writer had failed to be clear in their ideas, because at least then the Select Parse window showed there might be a bit of a problem right after we clicked the button:

opa-10-select-parse-double-list

So in the case above, we can see that there are two verbs in our made-up phrase, and the parser has flagged that to us. In Version 12, the validation process no longer shows the dialog above – te process is largely silent and transparent. I can see this as a benefit in terms of experience but it takes away the immediate sense of checking the text and parse. To get the same sort of information you have to go into the Attribute list in the Data tab, double-click the Attribute and then click the Change button shown below:

opa-12-edit-attribute-parses

I just think that it could be a little easier for users to find. But I’m just a slow learner. I would however say that this deserves to be in our top ten of back to basics items, since checking the parse and verifying the coherence of the generated text is something to get used to very early on. And it is valid for any language that is supported by Oracle Policy Modeler.

A quick thank you

While I am writing this, I want to thank all our readers and happily report that we have just gone past the 100 post mark. Here’s to the next 100!

Until the next time, take care!

Conditions & Conclusions in Oracle Policy Automation Spreadsheets

Conditions and Conclusions in Oracle Policy Automation Excel Spreadsheets

Since this came up in the recent Oracle Policy Automation discussions I was having with a customer, it seemed a good idea to summarize it for people who are Getting Started with Oracle Policy Automation. There are two basic ways to use the column headings in an Excel file.

Using Column Headers with Condition or Conclusion Text

This is the usage that is taught first in the Oracle Policy Automation Essentials training. Using a small fragment of a fictitious speeding fine table, you can see the Condition Heading and Conclusion Heading formats are populated with Attribute Text.

Oracle Policy Automation - Using Table Headers with Attribute Text

Using Generic Column Headers

The second choice is to use generic headers, in fact these are the default headers inserted into the Excel file when you add it to your Project. In this example below you can clearly see the condition and conclusion texts in the relevant columns and the generic headers. This can be useful if you want, for example, to assert that different booleans are true as a result of a table row being true.

Oracle Policy Automation - Condition and Conclusion Generic Headers

Excel Limitations

There are some limitations which can occur when you are unfamiliar with Excel spreadsheets. Although these are not both directly related to generic column header usage I thought I would add them here for new starters to remind of the importance of using multiple columns where appropriate.

Oracle Policy Automation - Generic Conclusion Attempted Negative Error

As you can see in the example above, the use of a negative sentence in the generic conclusion is not allowed. We would have to reformat our table to use different, specific columns for our conclusion.

Oracle Policy Automation - Non Generic Conclusion Examples

Similarly, attempting to squeeze too much into a condition column will create another validation error:

Oracle Policy Automation - Generic Conditions Attempted Multiple Conditions

Hopefully this helps clarify what is possible, and what will need to be considered when getting started with Oracle Policy Automation Excel Spreadsheets. The official documentation can be found online here.

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