Tag: Integration

Calling all Siebel and Intelligent Advisor folks

You are probably aware of this event already but I decided to promote it here on this site in case you had not come across it. A new virtual event held at the end of July 2020 called Oracle Dynamic Siebel Data Capture with Intelligent Advisor aims to help people understand how Siebel and Intelligent Advisor can really work together to assist in the capture of dynamic data for the CRM system. The virtual event is in two parts, in the first part it will look at the functional aspects of the integration and the second part will investigate the technical aspects of Siebel and Intelligent Advisor communicating successfully.

Having been on several projects where Intelligent Advisor is connected to and depends upon Oracle Siebel CRM for data to load into Interviews, or Web Services that provide Siebel with the power of Intelligent Advisor, I can recommend this virtual event to anyone in the field.

I can say that this virtual event is going to be a very useful overview for anyone who is thinking of connecting them or who wants to prepare for an upcoming project. We’ve often touched on this topic here on this website too.

Siebel and Intelligent Advisor

The functional part of the virtual event will be extremely interesting to learn about use cases and how user needs can be met with this integration. So don’t miss your chance to enrol and get the lowdown on this integration. It can revolutionize how Siebel embeds itself into the wider enterprise.

See you there : enrol using this link : Enrol Now for Oracle Dynamic Siebel Data Capture with Intelligent Advisor Virtual Event 29 July 2020. This is a good opportunity to connect with other Siebel and Intelligent Advisor folks and spread your network a little wider. Remember that there are regular events published on the Oracle Events website, and you can search by keyword as well. Find their Events Page over on their site at this address : https://www.oracle.com/search/events.

Continuous Delivery – OPA and Postman, Newman and Jenkins #3

Continuous Development – OPA and Postman, Newman and Jenkins #3

Following on from the two previous episodes, (part one / part two) the stage is almost set to move to automation over and above the simple concept of a Postman Collection. In this chapter we will see how to use data files in Postman to facilitate making use of CSV or JSON data in a dynamic way, and we will get Newman up and running. So let’s start with the first element.

In our Collection, we currently have one request which is sending information to OPA and getting a journey time and plan back in response. Great. But we want to test our journey planner with more than one journey. And we want to be able to easily change the journeys without having to mess with our request. So this is where the ability to load data into a Collection from a text (CSV or JSON) file comes in very handy in deed. In pictures

  • Create a CSV file with your data in it. For the project used in this example we would need to have something like this

Collection Data File

Notice the headers are origin and destination. They will become variables that we need to add to our request.

  • Make sure that the request is updated

So now my request looks like this:

Request Modified

Don’t forget to save your request. Now if you go to Collection Runner and run your Collection, you can use the Select File button and select your file:

Using a Data File in Postman

As soon as you select the file, you will see that the number of iterations changes to take into account all the rows in your file. Now when you want to push a new set of journey tests all you need is to change that file. Awesome!

Armed with all of this, we can now move to the next challenge. Postman is great but not everyone wants to use the graphical user interface all the time. How about the ability to run a Collection from the command line? That would be great AND would open up lots of options to running Windows Scripts and the like. Well, the news is good. Newman is the CLI (Command Line Interface) for Postman. Setting it up if you are not familiar with Node.js can be a bit daunting, but let’s just make a shopping list first:

  1. Install Node.js (here)
  2. Install Newman using the Node Package Manager
    This step should be as easy as opening the Node Command Prompt (which got installed in your Windows Start Menu in the first part) and typing something like the following:

    Installing Newman

  3. Run Newman from the Node.js prompt to use Postman Runner with your chosen Collection and Data File using the ultra simple command line.

So the last step might look a little like the following – notice that in the command line you specify the Collection (which you must first export to a file from inside Postman) and the Data File (wherever it is – I put both files in the same location for ease of use. And once the job is done, Newman reports back with it’s own inimitable, Teletext-style display of the output. A word of advice – before exporting a Collection make sure you have saved all the recent changes!

Exporting Ready for Newman

 

Once the Collection is exported, you might run it like this. This is just a simple example. It is possible to also load environment variables and more to fine tune it.

Newman Command Line

After a few seconds we get the output from Newman. Note the 4 iterations, and that iteration 3 failed due to an excessively long journey time.

Newman Output in Teletext

Now this is of course a major step forward – running Collections from the command line, feeding in data sets just by using a simple command line switch – these features mean we can really now start to think of automation in our approach to testing this project. But we are not done yet. The output from Newman is pretty ugly and we need to change that. By installing Newman HTML Reporter, we can get a much nicer file. Follow the steps in the link and then change your example command line to something like this:

Note the new command line option -r html (which means, use the HTML reporter) and the –reporter-html-export option (with two dashes) which ensures the output file is stored in the folder of my choice. And the HTML output is so much better:

Newman HTML Reporter

What a nice document. So far so good. We can spin these collections with just a command line. But wait a minute, what about running tests when you are not in the office – sure, you could write yourself some sort of Powershell Script in Windows. But what if you wanted to run a set of tests every day at 3pm, then again on Tuesdays, then once on the first Monday of every second month…it would get quite hard. And what if you wanted to send the HTML Report automatically to all your colleagues on the testing team…but only if there were failures?

And so, we march onward to the next phase. See you shortly!

Continuous Delivery – OPA and Postman, Newman and Jenkins #1

Continuous Delivery – OPA and Postman, Newman and Jenkins #1

For the first time in a while I was working to set up an example platform for testing purposes. Whilst a good portion of it is not specific to Oracle Policy Automation / Intelligent Advisor, it seemed both useful and appropriate to document some of the ideas, steps and conversation points in some posts here on the website. So without further ado, let’s get started. In this series we will look at setting up Oracle Policy Automation, Postman, Postman Runner, Newman and Jenkins to enable lights-out testing of REST batch or XML-based projects. Then, once we’ve done that, we will extend our reach to include HTML Interviews.

Firstly, let’s get a handle on the different tools in the kit. Postman, as many will know, is a visual client for testing REST APIs – at least that is what people know it for – but it is in fact capable of making any kind of HTTP call. Although the examples here will focus on the Oracle Policy Automation Batch API, you could use it for SOAP Assess as well.

Learn About Postman

Download Postman for Windows, iOS or Linux

To make a call to an Oracle Policy Automation Project, here are the prerequisites

  • The Project needs to be deployed
  • You need to have an API Client user and password
  • You need to be able to build a sample case.

So, let’s get started!

Assuming you have an Oracle Policy Automation Hub at your disposal, or someone who can sort you out with access to one, then you need to start with the creation of an account of type “API Client”. You will need to be given access to the determinations API, for at least the Collection (or “workspace” as it is now known) and then the account needs to be activated. It probably will look something like this:

Create User for Postman

  1. Go to Permissions > API clients
  2. Create a user and enable them
  3. Select at least the workspace where your project is deployed
  4. Save the user

Your project will need to be deployed in web service mode (not Interview mode, but if it is also used as an interview that’s fine too.

Check Project Deployed

So now you are ready to fire up Postman and get this show on the road. Remember that when using the REST api for determinations, you are going to be using OAuth2 as your authentication mechanism. This requires you to make a call first to an authentication URL, and receive a token. That token is valid for 1800 seconds, and must accompany any calls you make to your project. So, here is what you need to do in Postman:

Create a Collection. To keep things organized in Postman, put stuff in a Collection. Create one, give it a good name and then later you can put all your different Requests to OPA in this Collection.

Postman Collection OK

While creating your collection, you can set up the Authentication as well. This way, any Request you make that is stored in this collection can inherit the authentication method you define. It’s easier than doing it for every request (although that is also possible).

Postman Authentication Start

Select OAuth 2.0, Request Headers and then click the Get New Access Token button. Since this is the first time you have done this, you will now be tasked with filling in a detailed dialogue to explain to Postman how to go and get the magic “token” for Oracle Policy Automation. The screenshot is accompanied by comments below for each of the steps.

  1. Give the Access Token Authentication a name. You might have multiple Hubs and need to have different data for each of them, so a name is a good thing.
  2. Select Client Credentials
  3. Enter the address of the authentication endpoint. This is something like the address above (replace “http://localhost:7777/opa19d/” with your own URL to your Hub. Note that recently the Authentication URL has evolved, and it is now versioned. Check your version of the documentation to see if you can use the new URL format (“api/version/auth”) and gradually migrate all your calls to this new format, even if the old format works for now (this was introduced in version 20A).
  4. Enter the API Client you created or decided to use
  5. Enter the password you set up.
  6. Select Send client credentials in body
  7. Click Request Token

If everything went according to plan, you should see this:

Postman Authentication OK

Obviously, click Use Token. You are now ready for showtime. You have 1800 seconds to get your first request into Oracle Policy Automation!

Finish your Collection creation (we will be using the other features of the Collection later, in the other parts of this story). Create a new Request and save it in the Collection.

Let’s assume you have a Project ready to go. If you don’t the project I’m using in this demo can be downloaded here. The Body of the request (using Raw JSON as your format) would look something like this:

{ "outcomes": [
"b_success",
"resultstepnumber",
"resultstep",
"totaltime"
],
"cases": [
{
"@id": "1",
"origin": "Miromesnil",
"destination": "Oberkampf"
},
{
"@id": "2",
"origin": "Grands Boulevards",
"destination": "Concorde"
}
]
}

This assumes your project has a boolean to indicate success and some other attributes (in my case, the step number, the step and the total time. This project calculates the time to travel between two Paris Metro stations, in the days before confinement and lockdown. There are two cases to be tested. They are based on two attributes, namely origin and destination.

The output should look something like this:

{
"cases": [
{
"@id": "1",
"b_success": true,
"totaltime": 42,
"theresults": [
{
"@id": 0,
"resultstep": "Miromesnil",
"resultstepnumber": 1
},
{
"@id": 1,
"resultstep": "Saint Augustin",
"resultstepnumber": 2
},
{
"@id": 2,
"resultstep": "Havre Caumartin",
"resultstepnumber": 3
},
{
"@id": 3,
"resultstep": "Auber",
"resultstepnumber": 4
},
{
"@id": 4,
"resultstep": "Opéra",
"resultstepnumber": 5
},
{
"@id": 5,
"resultstep": "Richelieu Drouot",
"resultstepnumber": 6
},
{
"@id": 6,
"resultstep": "Grands Boulevards",
"resultstepnumber": 7
},
{
"@id": 7,
"resultstep": "Bonne Nouvelle",
"resultstepnumber": 8
},
{
"@id": 8,
"resultstep": "Strasbourg Saint-Denis",
"resultstepnumber": 9
},
{
"@id": 9,
"resultstep": "Réaumur Sébastopol",
"resultstepnumber": 10
},
{
"@id": 10,
"resultstep": "Arts et Métiers",
"resultstepnumber": 11
},
{
"@id": 11,
"resultstep": "Temple",
"resultstepnumber": 12
},
{
"@id": 12,
"resultstep": "République",
"resultstepnumber": 13
},
{
"@id": 13,
"resultstep": "Oberkampf",
"resultstepnumber": 14
}
]
},
{
"@id": "2",
"b_success": true,
"totaltime": 12,
"theresults": [
{
"@id": 0,
"resultstep": "Grands Boulevards",
"resultstepnumber": 1
},
{
"@id": 1,
"resultstep": "Richelieu Drouot",
"resultstepnumber": 2
},
{
"@id": 2,
"resultstep": "Opéra",
"resultstepnumber": 3
},
{
"@id": 3,
"resultstep": "Pyramides",
"resultstepnumber": 4
},
{
"@id": 4,
"resultstep": "Madeleine",
"resultstepnumber": 5
},
{
"@id": 5,
"resultstep": "Concorde",
"resultstepnumber": 6
}
]
}
],
"summary": {
"casesRead": 2,
"casesProcessed": 2,
"casesIgnored": 0,
"processorDurationSec": 0.04,
"processorCasesPerSec": 45.45
}

For the sake of space, I’ve cut this off before the end. But you should be getting the idea. The output is the time taken, and the steps from the origin to the destination. There are some stations on my map which are inaccessible (because I didn’t fill in the entire map of the Paris Metro) so the boolean tells me if the route is possible, and the total time is also shown. Now that we have the basic setup, in the next part we will add

  • A test script to calculate average response time
  • A test to see if the route is possible
  • A command line to be able to run this without Postman

See you in the next part!

Stunning Infographics with Oracle Policy Automation and Easelly #3

Stunning Infographics with Oracle Policy Automation and Easelly #3

The final part of this series is not really focused on Oracle Policy Automation, instead I am simply going to highlight to you just how easy it is to work with Easelly to integrate with it. In the previous part we looked at the brief piece of PHP that we used as a sample integration.

First, let’s look at the overall drawing interface of Easelly. Building a visual representation of your information is really easy:

As you saw in the short video, the tagging feature of Easelly is how you can integrate your Oracle Policy Automation attribute names and therefore use the power of Easelly to visualize your data.

Oracle Policy Automation and Easelly

For example, here is the infographic connected to the example project shown in the first part of the series.

Once the initial work is done to establish the integration, then we can easily (Pun intended) change the layout of the infographic, move elements, change fonts and so on without ever going to make any changes in Oracle Policy Automation.

Oracle Policy Automation and Easelly

The integration example is available in the OPA Hub Shop, and is completely for educational purposes only. I chose the PHP Custom Control as a way to accelerate my demonstration from an organizational point of view  – I was able to avoid Cross ORigin Scripting challenges. The Oracle Policy Automation platform has the advantage of handling both JavaScript and PHP for custom labels (and the link on the demonstration page is just a Custom Label).

Summary

The Easelly team have been very helpful in letting me build this integration demonstration – I encourage everyone to check out the product at Easel.ly and to reach out to me or someone else here at the OPA Hub Website if you want to take it a bit further!

Stunning Infographics with Oracle Policy Automation and Easelly #1

Stunning Infographics with Oracle Policy Automation and Easelly

Oracle Policy Automation and Easelly : Once in a while I come across something in the Oracle Policy Automation universe that just makes me go “Wow!!!”. And today’s post is like that. I was working on a demonstration the other day of a fairly familiar concept : a  retail audit or “store visit”.

Visits to retailers, whatever product you are selling, are pretty often rushed affairs, probably squeezed in a back room or just hunkering down on the corner of a work surface for a few minutes. It’s in the middle of the day, there are customers coming in and in spite of cordial relations, the retailer would really much rather be doing their job. And chances are, there are another 3 or 4 people coming in later to do the same thing as you.

Oracle Policy Automation is a real benefit in situations like this – you can perform what-ifs, demonstrate how the retailer is performing, simulate new scenarios to encourage and engage with them.

But when you’re fighting to get focus, and the room is airless and hot, you really need to be able to bring your A game. I’ve watched some amazing people doing this job, and they really impress how much they pack into the short time they are on the premises. But when they are gone, their message sometimes gets forgotten, mis-remembered or filed away. I started thinking how  Oracle Policy Automation could really leave a mark.

My first thoughts were to Oracle BI Publisher for a take-away or handout, and there are some excellent demonstrations out there, including in the Sample Projects (Healthy Eating). But I was still left wondering as to what might be a better solution. BI Publisher is in this case let down by it’s basic format and premise – Word. It is too linear, static and inflexible. You don’t use Word to create the most modern, web-friendly and engaging support materials. Then I had a bit of a brainwave.

Stunning Infographics with Oracle Policy Automation and Easelly

For a number of years I have been a user of Easelly – an online Infographics design platform. I’ve had great fun with it, using it to show results of surveys and I use their templates quite a lot when I need a framework for a new graphic. I’m not a designer, but I’m pleased with the easy learning curve and the results.

Recently Easelly have started offering a REST API to their “pro users”. And this allows for the generation of PDF or PNG content on the fly. For example, you have data in Oracle Policy Automation and you insert it on the fly into your best infographic. Send it by mail, print it before you visit – it doesn’t matter how you do it but you will definitely want to get this in front of your customer. Pro accoun

Oracle Policy Automation and Easelly

ts are not expensive – $24 US Dollar a year.

Here is an example, with an infographic designed by Easelly. You can see it on the right hand side of the page. I think you would agree that something like that could be done in BI Publisher, but not without a very robust skill set. With Easelly however, a tool built for infographics, it is considerably simpler. Please note : I’ve used the Easelly platform since it was launched, and I like to think I know BI Publisher quite well. So I can compare the two fairly objectively – and for modern infographics, the learning curve and capabilities of Easelly mean I would choose it every time.

Custom Control and REST API Integration

And here is the video that shows it being generated live in Oracle Policy Automation. That’s what I can a showstopper graphic. The great thing is, with the Oracle Policy Automation Custom Control concept , adding this to the Interview is a matter of minutes.

The data, the labels – all that is coming from Oracle Policy Automation much in the same way as for BI Publisher and Forms. Only way better looking!  In the next article in this series I’ll show you how to integrate Oracle Policy Automation with Easelly using, in this case, a PHP-based Custom Label Control.

Oracle Policy Automation and Siebel Innovation Pack 16 #6

Oracle Policy Automation and Siebel Innovation Pack 16 #6

Oracle Policy Automation and Siebel Innovation Pack 16The final post in this series looks at some of the “extras” that facilitate the integration of Oracle Policy Automation and Siebel Innovation Pack 16. By “extras” I mean other Web Services provided by Oracle Policy Automation, which will need to be taken into consideration when designing how these two applications can best work together but that are not directly related to the subject of getting the two applications to integrate using Applets, Integration Components, Workflow Processes and so on. Some of the content that follows is license-dependent, but should be of interest to any Oracle Policy Automation person.

Overview

Given that there are a number of different services to review, this post therefore is necessarily a mixture of many things. To summarise, there are

  • Administrative Services : The REST API of Oracle Policy Automation allows the creation of users of all the main types (integration users as well as normal ones) and also for the automation of deployment, and retrieval of associated information.
  • Execution Services : Assess, Interview and Answer (and the Server service, although it does not really need to be covered here).
  • Batch Execution Service : The REST API for Batch Execution allows for batched execution of goal determination

Together these are referred to as the Determinations API. The API is version specific in the sense that features are constantly being added (for example, integration user management is new to release 18A) so make sure you are using the correct WSDL file. For specific Oracle Policy Automation rulebases you can download the WSDL easily and that is shown in the videos below.

Assess Service

The Assess Web Service is probably the most famous service from a Siebel developer perspective, since it allows Siebel Enterprise to call Oracle Policy Automation and obtain an XML response (in the manner of a typical SOAP Web Service). It is often used therefore when no user interface is required.

The above video provides a short overview of how to derive the necessary information from Oracle Policy Automation and to use it in standard Web Service fashion. Developers should note that the post-processing of the Response will most likely occur in a Siebel Workflow Process or Script, in order to parse the response and deal with it.

As such, accessing an Oracle Policy Automation rulebase with Assess can be done very simply indeed. If the Oracle Policy Automation rulebase you are working with has a Connection in it (to Siebel or anything else) then you may also wish to use the Answer Service (see below).

Interview Service

The Interview Web Service was heavily used in the Oracle Policy Automation and Siebel Innovation Pack 15 integration, in order to mimic the behavior of the standard Interview using the Siebel Open UI framework. This Service is best suited to applications needed to provide the Interview User Interface in another technology (a Java application, a Silverlight Client, a Visual Studio application or whatever). It has a number of specifics and developers must manage session control, as the short video below illustrates.

Answer Service

The Answer service is reserved for Projects where there is a Connection object in Oracle Policy Automation, and as such provides a SOAP-based tool to pass data sets to the Project and receive the response. Amongst other things, therefore, it can be used to test the behaviour of an Oracle Policy Automation project when the external application (for example Siebel Enterprise) is not available.

REST API Services

As outlined above, there are in fact two REST API areas of interest : the administrative platform and the Batch Assessment service. Both require OAuth2 authentication and session management.

What’s Left to Do with Oracle Policy Automation and Siebel Innovation Pack 16?

So what is there still to do, for the Siebel Developer who has followed all the different posts and videos in this series? Well of course it is not possible to show everything, so here are the main points that you will now need to finish on your own : but most of them are entirely non-specific to Oracle Policy Automation and Siebel Innovation Pack 16.

There are of course many different things that you might want to do with Oracle Policy Automation and Siebel Innovation Pack 16, so at the OPA Hub Website we are always happy to hear from our readers with comments and questions : all you have to do is post at the bottom of the article. We obviously cannot run your project from here (but if you want us to, just get in touch!)  but you should feel free to contact us with questions, ideas for articles or anything else that is Oracle Policy Automation-related.

As Siebel Developers will know, Siebel Enterprise is now in version 17 and the next big thing, Siebel 18, is expected soon. The good news is that almost all of the steps shown here are completely identical in the newer version, since the changes are architectural rather than functional for the most part. If you come across anything completely different then, again, just let us know. We do plan on providing an update to this post series as and when the Siebel 18 is made generally available.

Finally

The OPA Hub hopes you all enjoyed the different posts in this series. For your bookmarks, here are the other posts in the series:

Oracle Policy Automation & Siebel #1

Oracle Policy Automation and Siebel Innovation Pack 16 #1

Oracle Policy Automation and Siebel Innovation Pack 16 : Tutorial Part OneFor some considerable time now, the good people at Oracle have made available a White Paper describing an alternative integration to Oracle Policy Automation and Innovation Pack 16 integration (as opposed to the Siebel Innovation Pack 15 approach involving a good deal of HTML and so forth, and not supporting some of the new screen layout features and dynamic elements of Oracle Policy Automation).

The white paper is clear enough on the concepts, and some of the screenshots are excellent 😉 but I am often asked about the details of the setup and implementation. In fact it is something I have to do quite often anyway. So I thought I would publish here some content that shows how Oracle Policy Automation and Innovation Pack 16 can work together.

This content is obviously a mixture of technical and functional, and by definition quite “Siebel-oriented” but I figured it would be of interest here as well, since we all might find ourselves in projects where the two behemoths meet. And I suppose that even someone who just wants to figure out how Oracle Policy Automation connects to “something” might find it interesting as well.

A word of warning : these videos were recorded “live” without editing – or at least without much editing – so there are “troubleshooting” sequences where I do something wrong and then go off and fix it : I figure that keeping that stuff in makes for a bit of “reality TV” so you can maybe gain time yourselves when you get into similar problems. Oracle Policy Automation and Siebel Innovation Pack 16 integration sometimes takes a bit of getting used to.

Finally, in case you were wondering, this is also the foundation for the Oracle Policy Automation and Siebel 16 Workshop that I run from time to time. So, to keep the post from becoming too long, I am going to publish this in several parts. The first part (this post) looks at the various options, the different functional scenarios and the technical approaches that we might encounter in Oracle Policy Automation and Siebel 16 environments. The next post will continue the process.

Welcome to the Videos

What will you need : an Introduction and some Prerequisites

Getting Oracle Policy Automation and Siebel 16 Connected : Part One – Design Time

Next…

In the next post in a couple of days, you will continue to learn about the Connection and test the first two operations using SOAP UI, before you move on to the core of the integration.

Oracle Policy Automation / Siebel : Live Classes in Toronto in February

Oracle Policy Automation / Siebel : Live Classes in Toronto in February

Oracle Policy Automation / Siebel : Live Classes in Toronto in February Update : thank you so much for giving me the opportunity to return to Toronto and deliver Oracle Policy Automation training. It was tremendous fun and I hope everyone had a good time. [16/2/18]

I wanted to tell you about the following events that I am hoping to run as in-class sessions in Toronto. Our friends at DesTech Toronto are hosting the following training events in February. I’ll be delivering them both so I would be very happy to see my Canadian colleagues and friends for these training sessions. Here are the details of the Oracle Policy Automation / Siebel : Live Classes in Toronto in February 2018:

Both of these need just a few more enrolments to confirm they will happen. I figure that a live class with a live instructor will be more effective for OPA customers and colleagues, as opposed to a virtual class. I’m happy to chat about OPA, OSVC, Siebel or anything else (ERP, AI, Bots 🙂 )

If you would like to enrol anyone on these courses, please let Patrice Brown pbrown@destech.com know urgently. I’m counting on you to spread the word!

PS : Every student will get a free copy of my Getting Started with Oracle Policy Automation [2018 Edition] with my compliments. That’s a CAD 65 gift for each attendee.

Siebel IP 16 and Oracle Policy Automation 12 Integration : Some Things to Think About

Siebel IP 16 and Oracle Policy Automation 12 Integration : Some Things to Think About

Siebel IP 16 and Oracle Policy Automation 12 IntegrationAs I am now approaching the end of another Siebel and Oracle Policy Automation integration setup, I thought I would take a few moments to list here the different things that may cause you some pain or anguish if you are attempting the same. This list is not exhaustive, and I expect I will be coming back to it from time to time and adding more Siebel IP 16 and Oracle Policy Automation 12 Integration pain points.

The starting point for the integration is the ZIP File provided on the Oracle Policy Automation Blog by the folks at Oracle.

Oracle Policy Automation

  1. Check that you have set the correct access parameters for Anonymous API Access
  2. Check that you have entered the same prefix_{0} in your Connection parameters as the Siebel team have added to their Web Service
  3. Check that the username and password provided in the Connection actually does work in Siebel
  4. If you are testing using the ApplyBenefits Policy Model, remember to use the new version supplied in the ZIP not the one provided when you installed Siebel, to get around the List of Values custom type errors.

Siebel Enterprise

  1. Check the XSL files. Specifically look for missing “field-type” mappings. For example, does your Oracle Policy Automation Project pass Boolean attribute types back and forth? Check that all the relevant  mappings are present in  the file StartInterviewToLoadResponse.xsl. If they are missing, add them accordingly. (In the example file, only number-val, text-val and date-val are present).
  2. Check the Filter Business Services used by the Web Services in Request and Response are in the Respository and compiled in your SRF.
  3. Remember that the example “OPA Submit For PUB Sample Intake Contact.xml” Workflow Process only makes minor updates to Siebel : there is a hard coded reference to updating the Job Title Field with the text “OPA Fan” which you need to get rid of.
  4. As well as making the necessary changes to the Integration Object references, you will need to obtain a reference to the returned PropertySet and iterate through the responses yourself, which will require Scripting or a Business Service-based approach with the Row Set Transformation Toolkit if you have a license for it. Then you will need to adapt the Workflow Process to do whatever you want it to do (records being updated or inserted).
  5. The GetCheckPoint and SetCheckPoint Workflow Processes and associated logic will not function unless you have already installed Oracle Policy Automation Connector for Siebel version 10, since the database tables used in the example are not part of the version 12 integration.

General Advice for Siebel IP 16 and Oracle Policy Automation 12 Integration

It’s no secret that the Message Logging in Oracle Policy Automation Hub is pretty weak. In case of any issues, you are far better off using SoapUI, and setting the Web Service-related, Workflow Process-related and Object Manager-related logging in Siebel to higher than normal levels. Additionally, consider adding “dump to file” steps to the Workflow Processes that you can control using Decision Points based on a “Debug Mode” input variable”.

Guest Post : The Lazy Expert – Oracle Policy Automation Public Cloud with Oracle Service Cloud Part 2

The Lazy Expert -Oracle Policy Automation Public Cloud with Oracle Service Cloud Part 2

Introduction

We are continuing our Lazy Expert series of posts, with an explanation of how OPA Public Cloud, and the rulebases deployed there, can be used within the Oracle Service Cloud application. In case you have missed out on our first port of this series, you can find it here. With the right Nudge, our Lazy Expert is not so lazy after all. If you are missing the original post about the lazy expert, here it is.

Part 1  looked at exploring, deploying and verifying the”RightNowSimple” rulebase to work with your Service Cloud Connection. The rulebase was launched directly using the Interview Session URL. In this post, we will be looking at embedding this Interview into the Consumer Portal of Service Cloud so that anonymous visitors to the portal can use this same interview in self-service mode. This is accomplished by publishing an “Answer”, with Interview Session URL embedded in an IFRAME, to the Consumer Portal.

Pre-requisites

  1. Steps in Part 1 are completed and the Service Cloud Connector is verified to be working as expected.

Publish the “Answer” to Service Cloud Portal for anonymous use

In our simple example, we are going to embed the interview from Oracle Policy Automation as a publicly accessible page in a mythical “portal” website. Customers will be able to browse the website without in any way identifying themselves – anonymously.

  1. Create a new “Public” Answer in Service Cloud as shown below.
  1. In the Answer Tab, Source Sub tab, specify the content using an IFRAME tag as shown below.

The IFRAME tag is of the format

<iframe height="580" src="https://server/path/web-determinations/startsession/RightNowSimple" width="100%"></iframe>

where the “server/path” should be replaced with the values appropriate for your Oracle Policy Automation Cloud environment.

Oracle Policy Automation Public Cloud

  1. Save the Answer record. Make sure that the Answer you have created was using Source mode, otherwise your IFRAME will not display properly.

Verify the results in Oracle Service Cloud Consumer Portal

  1. Search / Navigate to the Answer record in the Consumer Portal, as an anonymous user using the keyword or text that you entered when creating the Answer above.
  2. View the details of this Answer and work with the Interview Session as normal. The result will be the same – the Contact is saved in your Service Cloud instance.

Oracle Policy Automation Public CloudSummary

This post explains how the benefits of an OPA rulebase and the corresponding Interview experience can be made available for anonymous users using the Service Cloud Consumer Portal. Check this space when we will continue next with part 3 of this series that focuses on embedding such interview sessions into the Consumer Portal of Oracle Service Cloud for known contact users…

 

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