Welcome to the OPA Hub!


Category Archives: Oracle Policy Automation

Extensions : A First Style Extension

Hi There!


This content is accessible only to logged in users of the OPA Hub Website.

To Register takes only 10 seconds and uses LinkedIn for authentication.

Once registered you can change your OPA Hub password and manage it independently of LinkedIn.

We recommend you keep different passwords for all your sites.

To register, click the Log in link in the menu at the top of your page.

Thanks, the OPA Hub Website.

Data Model Viewer – Updates

Hi There!


This content is accessible only to logged in users of the OPA Hub Website.

To Register takes only 10 seconds and uses LinkedIn for authentication.

Once registered you can change your OPA Hub password and manage it independently of LinkedIn.

We recommend you keep different passwords for all your sites.

To register, click the Log in link in the menu at the top of your page.

Thanks, the OPA Hub Website.

Input REST Batch Requests into Debugger

Input REST Batch Requests into Debugger

One of the new features introduced in 19C is the ability to use REST batch sessions (or requests, to give them their real name) directly in the Debugger. This is a great leap forward. Up to now, where I am working at the moment, we had built a tool to translate the REST into XML but it was still less than optimal.

So you can imagine how excited I was when I saw this new feature arrive in the product. There is, however, one major issue that I still find very frustrating. You will understand perhaps if I show you an example. Let’s consider the following. I have a batch of 10000 REST Batch cases that have been used in our testing and saved in JSON format. Now I want to open one of these in my Debugger to investigate what is happening. I open the project in Oracle Policy Modeling and I rush to the Debugger.

REST Batch

The pop-up window shows that my JSON file has been loaded, and shows me…the case id. Which from a functional point of view, of course, tells me nothing at all. Most of the testers here would be unable to remember which case represents which testing scenario. What we would have loved (and we are going to ask for) is the possibility to choose what to display in that window. For example, in our case, maybe if we show the identifying attribute from one of the entities being used, that would be more than enough for us to be able to recognize which case it is.

This might not seem a big deal but when you have an operations department who simply sends you the file and says it does not work i(they don’t necessarily know anything about Oracle Policy Automation apart from how to run it) it can be frustrating working backwards from REST case numbers back to scenarios that we can relate to our Test Cases in Excel.

I’m going to be accused of mixing everything up but it would be nice to have something easier to recognize, or perhaps a parameter that we could change.

What’s new in Oracle Policy Automation 19C?

Hi There!


This content is accessible only to logged in users of the OPA Hub Website.

To Register takes only 10 seconds and uses LinkedIn for authentication.

Once registered you can change your OPA Hub password and manage it independently of LinkedIn.

We recommend you keep different passwords for all your sites.

To register, click the Log in link in the menu at the top of your page.

Thanks, the OPA Hub Website.

Fun with Aliases and Strings #3

Hi There!


This content is accessible only to logged in users of the OPA Hub Website.

To Register takes only 10 seconds and uses LinkedIn for authentication.

Once registered you can change your OPA Hub password and manage it independently of LinkedIn.

We recommend you keep different passwords for all your sites.

To register, click the Log in link in the menu at the top of your page.

Thanks, the OPA Hub Website.

Certification Workshop Example

Oracle Policy Automation Cloud 2019 Certification #2

Oracle Policy Automation Cloud 2019 Certification #2

I don’t normally comment on certification examinations – I don’t really feel that a website like this should focus on getting people certified – sure, we can help you prepare and give you lots of fun things to do while you get ready. But we are never going to be selling “certification dumps” or any nonsense like that. If you cannot prepare for an examination, you shouldn’t be taking it. End of story.

But, since I just took the Oracle Policy Automation Cloud 2019 Certification today, I thought I would give you some heads-up on the kinds of questions that I noticed (and bear in mind, that my memory is not what it used to be). Again, I’m not going to give you the questions, I’m going to give you some pointers as to the kind of question you might see.

Firstly, this is clearly an update of the 2017 Certification, so if you took it and passed, many of the question styles and content will be familiar to you. But the vast majority of them have undergone review, editing and minor changes.

Question Styles That Might Bug You

You need to do X. Place the following things (1-9) in order of doing them to achieve X. If a step is required more than once, only mark the first time the step is used.

The steps are unclear, the answers are unclear, and some of the terminology used is dubious.

You have an entity model X to achieve Y. What kind of relationship is Z?

Beware your terminology – get in your head that it’s asking for a relationship even if the example provided is not obvious.

Which of the following is a good example of the correct phrasing for X

Be very clear about what that question style is asking. Many of them look like they are asking Y but they want X. Re-read the question several times!

Choose four things that are true about X functionality

Some of the examples I saw were completely generic – you know the sort of thing. They ask you about swimming 100 meters, and one of the answers is “a swimming pool is full of water” whilst all the other answers are about breathing, swimming technique, strokes. Watch out for these “sleeping choices”.

Which of the following are incorrect when talking about AND and OR

These questions require a certain amount of time to consider – which ones have the correct combinations of AND, OR, ANY, ALL, BOTH, EITHER and all the other combinations of grouping words. Read it slowly!

Poor Quality Graphics

Aside from these bugbears, the other thing that still annoys me is the quality of the screenshots used. And of course, this is dependent on the software used for the certification examination, I know that. But at least try and give clear, large images without any silly stuff (like the Word examples that have clearly gotten the grammar and spelling check with the blue line underneath the text). It’s a question of quality.

Web Page Not up to date

One thing that bothers me is that the Certification page on the Oracle Website does not specify which version this examination has been validated against. And I saw at least 1 question for which the answer would have been different, depending on the version.

Good Luck!

Good luck to you all. If I have any more thoughts, I’ll let you know. And yes, I did pass :). If you are interested in accelerating your learning, read about our workshops here.

 

Fun with Aliases and Strings #2

Fun with Aliases and Strings #2

Returning to the ” Aliases and Strings”  theme of the previous post, where we looked into an example of String concatenation. Just a reminder, in the previous article you created the entity model and set up a couple of relationships, before using a rule to decide if the ticker tape instance is a member of a relationship called  the next ticker tapes.

So here is the continuation of the document you saw in the previous steps:

Aliases and Strings #2

The first part should look reasonably familiar, since it builds on the example with the next ticker tapes. But is uses the second relationship, called the closest ticker tape. Note the wording closest ticker tape not ticker tapes. We are aiming for the closest one, or if you prefer, the next one in line. So for ticker tape number 3, the closest would be number 4.

Dodgey Ticker

We again use an alias, but things get a bit sticky in the following parts. Where did the further ticker tape come from? Well, perhaps unsurprisingly, it’s another alias. You see, we already used the other ticker tape in the conclusion so we need to use another word : in this case further was my personal choice, but it could have been another word that meant something in this context. So by now we have the following, expressed in conversational style :

Compare ticker tape A (with other tapes, let’s say B, C and D). B,C or D will be called the closest ticker tape if the following is true.

  1. B,C or D have an ID that is higher than the ID for A
  2. Using the next ticker tapes as your starting point (so, B C and D)
  3. Compare them (so B compared to C, B compared to D etc) to this rule
  4. Is B’s ID is less than or equal to C (for example)?

So we end up with the ticker tape that is in the next ticker tapes AND has an ID that is less than or equal to the other next ticker tapes. So it is the closest one.

I’m reminded of this excellent conversation from Monty Python since it can get a bit confusing at first:

video

The final rule concerns whichever ticker tape has the longest string. And that string is what you are about to create, for each and every instance of your entity.

We’re coming with you!

You will generate a string of text for each of the entity instances (so, for each of the ticker tape instances). And this string will be the driver of a logical loop.

Firstly, let’s set your scene and remind of the context:

  1. “Text 1”
  2. “Text 2”
  3. “Text 3”

Each ticker tape has a text message, for example “Text 1” . This message should be concatenated with the other text messages to form a long “final” string. Each should have a comma inserted between them, into the final string, and of course a “.” at the end. Just to make a nice tidy “final” string. It might look like “Text 1, Text 2, Text 3.”.

Aliases and Strings #2

So each instance has a text string, and a “final text”. The “final text” will be the ticker tape text string concatenated with the closest ticker tape’s text string, plus a comma if required – for example if there are no “next ticker tapes” for a given tape, it’s because we have reached the end of the instances (number 4 , if there is no number 5).

The following attributes give us the numbers used in the table above:

Aliases and Strings #2

And the final (final) global attribute:

Final String Result

Aliases and Strings #2

In the next part of this series, there will be a chance to look back on the techniques, observe the warning message and generally investigate your logical loop.

Aliases and Strings part three will be with you in a few days, In the meantime of course you can read the online help here.

Fun with Aliases and Strings

Hi There!


This content is accessible only to logged in users of the OPA Hub Website.

To Register takes only 10 seconds and uses LinkedIn for authentication.

Once registered you can change your OPA Hub password and manage it independently of LinkedIn.

We recommend you keep different passwords for all your sites.

To register, click the Log in link in the menu at the top of your page.

Thanks, the OPA Hub Website.

OPA Word Rules – Level Up!

Hi There!


This content is accessible only to logged in users of the OPA Hub Website.

To Register takes only 10 seconds and uses LinkedIn for authentication.

Once registered you can change your OPA Hub password and manage it independently of LinkedIn.

We recommend you keep different passwords for all your sites.

To register, click the Log in link in the menu at the top of your page.

Thanks, the OPA Hub Website.

OPA Focus Group in Paris

OPA Focus Group in Paris

And so, on to the second Focus Group of the week. In the middle of a heatwave, I traveled to Paris from my current base in Normandy, avoiding a landslide (which closed the railway line for 2 days just before I took this train, and which delayed my return from Utrecht by 24 hours), and a brush fire (which sent us down a branch line and into the countryside for a nice long delay in the heat) and finally getting to my hotel around midnight instead of 21h00. Let’s hear about the OPA Focus Group in Paris.

Anyway, enough moaning. This was, as far as I know, the first Focus Group in Paris since 2017- so my expectations were high for a good turnout in spite of the heat (quite a few public buildings and schools had already closed). And I was not disappointed.

Lots of Customer Showcases

The morning kicked off with a nice coffee and croissant meet and greet, and the agenda of the morning sessions was a great chance to get to know the customers of the two showcases being presented:

  • PSA (Peugeot/ Citroen / DS) Customer Overview

Everyone knows them, and it was very interesting to hear about their experiences in Oracle Policy Automation. I’ve said this before, but these events are wonderful opportunities to get ahead in the community, but most importantly, a great opportunity to meet like-minded practitioners! The room was filled with a wide variety of customers, partners and even some “not yet customers” – these events are popular because “what’s  said in the room, stays in the room” – so there is no pressure or sales talk.

PSA uses Oracle Service Cloud and Oracle Policy Automation for CX Support (service requests, loyalty, and working with owners of vehicles – Peugeot, Citroen, DS). Perhaps the most interesting part for me was the explanation of the process evolving from Word, letters, paper, stamps, laborious steps involving expensive, manual operations into a simple to use Oracle Policy Automation interview. The return on investment is obvious both for the customer (better service, more reactivity) and for the group.

  • Davin then introduced a variety of use cases from worldwide customers : Dexcom, Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, WestPac, BeachBody, Princes Trust to name a few. Very interesting to see the different business processes.

Davin continued after the break, and presented the future plans for Oracle Policy Automation. As human expectations grow more demanding, Oracle Policy Automation is increasing in power and capability. It is fantastic to see Internet of Things, Service Cloud and Oracle Policy Automation working together.

The detailed part of Davin’s presentation provided lots of information about future plans, and was the subject of many questions from the audience. And me!

  • SACEM Customer Overview

Another excellent customer overview, this time from another business sector entirely : rights management for playing music in bars and restaurants. Wonderful mobile offline demonstration (with a telephone call in the middle, in the mobile device!) with a great user experience.

  • INDRA Customer Overview

Indra is a specialist in vehicle recycling – connecting car dealers with recycling operators and other partners. A very interesting use case, with some complex Oracle Policy Automation rules for calculation of Service Level Agreements, Clauses, Tariffs and assigning a partner, among other things.

OPA Focus Group in Paris

Here are a few photos of the event. Make sure you come to an event near you – this year (there are quite a few still to come!)  or next year!

OPA Focus Group in Paris

Indra

OPA Focus Group in Paris

SACEM

OPA Focus Group in Paris

PSA